There are lots of ways to get help in this course—here are four big tips:

  1. Read the website: make sure you read the stuff on this course website. In particular, you should know about the course policies and the stuff on the resources page.

  2. Attend your weekly lab session: you should look at the lab material ahead of time and come prepared. Make sure you’re logged into Microsoft Teams and know where to find your lab channel. If you know what aspects of the course you’re struggling with then you can let your tutor know—they’re really keen to help you out. This course has great tutors, so make the most of your lab times.

  3. Start your assignments early: you probably hear this a lot, but you’ll save yourself a lot of pain if you start the assignments early. Make an initial commit (just add your name!) to make sure that your git push is working correctly, and work on it at least till you get stuck—that way you’ll know what stuff you need to ask questions about. Because we use GitLab for assignment submissions we can tell when you made your first push—so if you only started the night before the due date then there’s no hiding that fact.

  4. Ask good questions on the forum or on Microsoft Teams: you’re probably not the only one with the same question, so if you ask it there then others can benefit as well. Learning how to ask good questions is a useful skill in this course and beyond, and this course gives you a chance to practice that skill :)

  5. Private messages should go be Discourse messages to the comp1720admins group (here’s a link) (if you want your tutors to see) or to the course convenor if it’s for their eyes only. We don’t encourage private questions, but we understand there are some situations where a direct line to your tutors or lecturer is required.

Important dates

It’s important to know when the deadlines are for adding and dropping courses. Check out the university calendar for a full list of all the dates you need to know about.

Helpful contact info

Here are a few more places you can go and people you can talk to.

Course reps

Your course reps are:

  • Jarvis Huang (COMP6720)
  • Benedict Cusack (COMP6720)

Both Jarvis and Benedict are here to listen to your concerns or issues confidentially, you can contact them over email, Teams, or on the forum.

If you want to be a course rep, get in touch with the course convenor.

You can get in touch with them at any time with feedback about the course, and you’ll be anonymous (I won’t know who gave the feedback).

CECS Student Services

(+612) 6125 4450

studentadmin.cecs@anu.edu.au

CECS Student Experience team

studentexp.cecs@anu.edu.au

ANU Students’ Association

(+612) 6125 2444

anusa.com.au

ANU Computer Science Students’ Association

cs.club.anu.edu.au

Feedback

You can send course feedback via cecs.anu.edu.au/course-feedback

Feeling lost

If you’re feeling lost, that’s ok. The most important thing to remember is that the lecturers and tutors really want to help you out, so make sure you let us know if you have any questions.

It’s a proven fact (with science!) that there’s often a gap between a student’s “felt” proficiency (how much you feel you know) and actual proficiency (how much you actually know) during the course:

felt vs actual proficiency

So if you feel like you’re struggling, you may well be at the “bottom” part of that yellow curve, just before the moment when it all comes together. Hang in there!

General information & support services

If you’ve been studying at the ANU for a while you probably already know about these websites, but here’s a list of various tools/repositories of information to help you in your studies at the ANU.

Updated:    21 Sep 2020 / Responsible Officer:    Head of School / Page Contact:    Charles Martin