Charles Martin

Charles Martin

I’m a lecturer in the Research School of Computer Science, a music technology researcher, and a computer musician and percussionist.

I studied music, maths, and computing at the ANU in the early 00s then got interested in using computers in performance, in particular creating new musical instruments and performance environments. This really opened up a new creative world for me and worked as a musician for a while starting groups like Ensemble Evolution and Last Man to Die. In those groups I did a lot of close work with visual artists, musicians, and actors to develop interactive visuals and new kinds of performance space.

For the last few years, I’ve been researching how mobile computer and machine learning can work together in musical instruments of the future.

You can see more of my creative computing work on my homepage

Tony Curran

Tony Curran

I’m a sessional Lecturer in the School of Art & Design and have had numerous solo exhibitions around Australia and been considered as a finalist for major national awards. This year I’m really excited to be the helping to co-ordinate COMP1720 from the art side of things. I’ll be explaining some art theory topics in the lectures, helping out in labs & generally helping make sure this course stays creative and fun.

I have a long-running collaboration with coders at the Research School of Computer Science (supported initially by a 2016 Vice-Chancellor’s College Visiting Artist Fellowship) exploring the hypothesis that digital art is made compelling when the work demonstrates an equal balance of human gesture to mechanical structure; that is, artwork as simultaneously human and machine generated. You can follow my latest work in this vein on Insta (look for #wigglesandgrids) or at https://www.tonycurran.net.

Alfred Le

Alfred Le

I have always had an interest in understanding the world around me. As a child, this manifested with me taking apart and repairing toys, as opposed to actually playing with them. This curiousity has led me to dip my toes in a bunch of different things throughout my life; and explains my wildly unrealated degrees of IT and Psychology. My curiousity around technology naturally led to programming. I struggled a lot through COMP1100 and COMP1130, and on a whim tried out COMP1720 as my last 1000 level elective. It was at that point I finally started to enjoy programming. COMP1720 allowed my curious-backwards-engineering brain to do its magic and create whatever I imagined 😀

When I’m not studying, I’ll probably either be teaching Karate, or posting covers for SoundCloud; and I might give you a link if you ask really nicely.

Brent Schuetze

Brent Schuetze

For as long as I can remember, I have always had an affinity with machines and technology. Growing up in rural New Zealand did stunt the growth of this somewhat, but I still loved playing with anything electronic or mechanical. But it wasn’t until I started my undergrad at ANU in computer science that I really started to get into the technical aspects surrounding this technology that I had grown up with. A few years on and I have been lucky enough to have the opportunity to help other people interested in computer science find their passion as I was able to find mine, and I’m looking forward to another semester helping all of you find yours!

Cecilia Lao

Cecilia Lao

Up until a few months before I graduated high school, I, like 99.99% of people at the ANU, was convinced I was going to work for the UN. Then I took an online coding course and liked it so much I decided to study Advanced Computing at last minute instead.

When I’m not glued to my laptop, you can find me making terrible puns, learning foreign languages or consuming dangerous amounts of bubble tea. Whether it’s about technical or creative problems, I’m always happy to help so come have a chat if you see me around!

Edith Fordyce-Croker

Edith Fordyce-Croker

This time last year I was gearing up to undertake my first coding course, 1720. Coming from a humanities background, the first three weeks were challenging as I was wrapping my head around many new concepts. However, by leaning on the teaching resources and asking lots of questions I found my footing and started to appreciate how coding can be fantastically creative. 1720 offers a lot of creative freedom, which can be daunting but also very exciting. So, if you have an idea, I encourage you to try and make it happen

When I’m not at university you’ll probably find me playing soccer, attempting to grow plants, or procrastibaking!

Harrison Shoebridge

Harrison Shoebridge

As a kid I spent my free time filming movies with my younger brothers and designing Rube Goldberg-esque contraptions that would never get built. When I discovered programming in year 8 it was a major light-switch moment: I realised I could do something to engage the two (previously separate) parts of my brain at the same time. I dabble in a lot of different areas: games, apps, websites, and sometimes things that are a bit more low level!

Outside of programming I spend my time rock climbing, listening to music, reading, and attempting to trail run (when I’m not injured).

Yichen Wang

Yichen Wang

Two years ago, I made my very first, significant and independent decision against my lovely parents—studying abroad in Australia and pursuing my ‘dream’ which I wasn’t clear at that time 😉 while the only thing I knew was I need some change from the yawn and enjoy my life as much as possible. So here I am! During my study in ANU, I’m lucky enough to not only acquire fruitful knowledge but also see the opportunity of combing my interest in arts with computer science with the help and inspiration from my lecturers, colleagues and fellow students, which I dedicate to do more in the future.

You can find more of my work at https://yichenwangs.com. If you are interested in paintings, imagegraphy or computer science topics related to them, please do talk to me and I’m more than happy to share my ideas with you!

Updated:    21 Sep 2020 / Responsible Officer:    Head of School / Page Contact:    Charles Martin